5 Causes of Sciatica

Sciatic Back Sciatic NerveFirst, let us define what sciatica actually is and is not. Sciatica is, very specifically, pain along the sciatic nerve stemming from irritation of that nerve. The sciatic nerve is formed from a conglomeration of spinal nerves in the low back which binds together into one sheath. This nerve runs under the piriformis muscle in the pelvic area, then runs in between the two parts of the biceps femoris, also known as the hamstrings. It has become common to call any pain in the leg which is suspected to come from the back, sciatica. However, sciatica is a nerve pain which is the same feeling you get when you hit your “funny bone.” Most leg pain, and consequently what most people call sciatica, is actually referred pain. That is a different post. To be a true diagnosis of sciatica, it must be nerve pain that stems from the lumbar spine and runs into the buttock and/or down the backside and middle of the thigh. Now that we have that out of the way, let’s talk about what causes it!

  1. Disc Injury. Disc injuries are the most common back ailment. When a disc bulges or herniates, it can occupy the space where the spinal nerves exit from the vertebral column. If a disc bulges too far it can push against the nerve root causing pain to travel down the sciatic nerve and beyond. Sometimes, the bulge will hit the nerve and then pull back enough so that the sciatic pain is not constant. If the disc is in constant contact with the nerve, one can experience pain, numbness and tingling, weakness, and other symptoms. Chiropractic can help, but these can take a long time to heal and consistency makes the difference. Traction, rehabilitation exercises, physical therapy, and stretching can also help if done properly. If it comes to it, cortisone injections and surgery may be last resort options.
  2. Inflammation. With injury comes inflammation. Though the disc is the most common injury, there are several other structures in the area of the nerves that make the sciatic nerve that can be injured. Inflammation is toxic and can cause its own set of issues. Nerves are especially sensitive to inflammation. Icing, NSAIDs like ibuprofen, Chiropractic, and steroids can all help reduce inflammation. When the inflammation is in check, the back and sciatic pain will diminish. When the area with the sciatic nerve or nerve root is inflamed. The symptoms will remain constant.
  3. Sacro-Iliac (SI) Joint Dysfunction. The sciatic nerve crosses the SI Joint just after it forms the large nerve. If the pelvis shifts or is not working properly, it can irritate the Sciatic Nerve through direct pressure, inflammation, or by causing muscle tightness or spasms from the imbalance. Adjusting the SI joint will help reduce inflammation and muscle guarding, as well as move it away from contact with the nerve if that is the case. Chiropractic is by far the best thing for this case but a clever physical therapist can help, too. Exercise, stretching, and icing may help but can irritate it, as well.
  4. Piriformis Syndrome. This diagnosis has become pretty popular. I find that it is misdiagnosed more often than not. The piriformis is a little pear-shaped muscle (hence the name, piri means pear), that spans the SI joint. The Sciatic Nerve runs underneath it in most individuals. If this muscle tightens, it can compress the sciatic nerve and cause sciatica. The piriformis can tighten for various reasons including any of the above-mentioned maladies. Usually, I find the piriformis is a secondary issue. Sometimes, however, it can take on a life of its own after the other condition has resolved. If it is, truly, piriformis syndrome, the best thing to do is have a specialist perform a muscle release on it. Active release, myofascial release, Bowen, Rolfing, massage, etc. can all help if done right. Be aware that if it only helps for a little while, then there is probably another issue that is still causing the muscle to tighten or guard.
  5. Direct Contact. Because the Sciatic Nerve runs through the buttock and down the back of the leg, the way one sits can cause sciatica. The most common cause is a wallet in the back pocket. Additionally, a seat that curves upward along its lip can put pressure on the legs and irritate the nerve. Unfortunately, I have seen this most often in vehicles.  The solution for these is obvious. The trick is to figure it out before it causes problems more difficult to remedy.

There you have it. Probably not a comprehensive list but definitely the most common causes. Sciatica is actually rarer than it seems. When you have it, however, it is very painful and can be difficult to treat. If you are experiencing sciatica or any type of pain or other symptoms down the leg, chiropractic can help. And, like all conditions, being prompt and consistent makes for better and quicker healing.

5 Things to Do When a Rib “Goes Out”

Rib HeadsRib pain can be miserable. I cannot tell you how many patients have come in to see me after visiting the Emergency Department because they suspected a heart attack or something serious. Pain in the chest, shortness of breath, radiating pain down the arm, nausea, etc. Sounds like a heart attack but all of the tests are negative. So what do you when the emergency docs send you home and tell you it is nothing? Most likely you are dealing with a rib that is either stuck or not moving in the way it is supposed to. Here are five things to do, and not to do, to help.

  1. Heat and Ice. One of the biggest complaints, when a rib is out, is muscle spasming. Heat will help you endure a muscle spasm. There is a caveat, however. Heat brings blood to an area and if that blood is not flushed out, it will cause more inflammation. So, use heat for 20 minutes and then walk around for a while or ice it. Ice drives away inflammation. Ice for 20 minutes maximum. Always end with icing. For more information on heating and icing, go here.
  2. Massage, but be careful. As mentioned, muscles are often tight when a rib is not functioning properly. massage can really help to calm down the muscles. Here again, a word of warning. Often times, the person giving the massage will feel a good sized bump and mistake what is really the head of the rib for a muscle knot. Rubbing this bump will not only be painful but can increase symptoms. Working on the areas around it can be quite helpful. Massaging after the rib is moving again is great.
  3. TENS or Electric Stimulation. A great, non-drug option for killing a spasm and managing pain is to use e-stim, TENS or something similar. These are basically devices that send electrical pulses through wires and patches over muscles. There are several options of machines and can be purchased at various locations or from Amazon. Price and quality range drastically but I have found that the inexpensive units work pretty well.
  4. Get it adjusted! At the end of the day, until the rib starts moving properly it will cause problems. Not all chiropractors are great at adjusting ribs as they can be difficult. Likewise, you really need to have the specific rib adjusted and not just do a general spine adjustment. Even after you get it adjusted it may still feel out. Remember that the muscles have most likely tightened around it and formed a knot. Symptoms can take a while to settle down.
  5. Mind your posture and quit trying to stretch it. Typically, ribs go out because of a forward head and shoulder posture. So, why do we always try and stretch that same way to get it to feel better? Likewise, stretching spasming muscles does not really work. It drives me crazy when I adjust a rib and the first things my patient does is check to see if stretching forward still hurts. That is like separating a wound to see if it has healed yet. If you keep doing it, it will never heal. Instead, look straight ahead and pull your shoulder blades down and back. Here is the vintage YouTube video I created to demonstrate. If you do this exercise and it is still really painful, chances are the rib is out again.

Ribs can definitely be tricky. Sometimes they stay in after one adjustment and sometimes they take several adjustments. Usually, the longer it is out the more adjustments it will take. The rib joints at the front where it connects to the sternum can go out, too. These are also very painful and can be adjusted, although it is a different method. Please remember that although rib pain is brutal, it is not that damaging. Stressing about it will only complicate the healing process. If you have pain to one side of the spine by the shoulder blades, in the front next to the sternum, radiating along the ribs, or all of the above, just come in and we can either help you or, at least, point you in the proper directions.

Decompression and Traction for the Intervertebral Discs

Decompression Vacuum EffectLife tends to be really hard on the discs between the vertebrae in our spines. Discs are made of a flexible cartilage with a thick fluid and a hard nucleus in the middle. Discs are designed to improve motion and provide shock absorption which makes them the most abused structure in the spine. When we bend forward, the disc bulges backward. This can cause weakness due to wear and tear on the inner posterior aspect of the disc. Likewise, placing too much strain on the top can make the disc bulge all the way around. This is seen when someone is overweight, does a lot of high impact exercises, or loads the body with too much weight like with squats.

Each time a disc bulges farther beyond its normal borders, micro-tearing occurs. Tears heal with scar tissue which is, by its nature, not as pliable and can tear again. It is possible to train scar tissue into flexibility and help it act like regular disc tissue but it takes time and training. Too often the more rigid scar tissue will tear and recreate the original problem. This is where traction or decompression comes in.

I may offend some docs who are big into decompression therapy but to me, it and traction are the same thing. I think they started using the fancier word “decompression” because they developed more sophisticated and expensive equipment and needed a word to match. I must confess, though, as a linguist, decompression does portray a clearer and more concise picture of what we are hoping to accomplish. But, I digress. With decompression or traction (and from here I will use the words interchangeably) the goal is to take away pressure from the disc. When pressure on the disc is lessened, the disc can reshape and heal.

Traction can be accomplished in a number of ways. The method I am asked about most is about home-unit to hang upside down. In this case, one straps their ankles into a clamp and then leans backward to a specified angle. Some units will allow a person to hang completely upside down. I recommend 45 degrees to start. That is usually enough to open the disc space without getting a head rush that will shorten the traction time.

There is a host of other traction devices. Most of them can be found on late night infomercials. All of have some legitimacy but some are definitely better than others. The one I have seen a lot recently has the person lying down with their heels resting on a moveable piece that pulls and moves the legs side to side. I am not sure how much traction is occurring but movement is always good. One of the better ones I have seen in the past looks like a big cushy loop that hangs in a doorway. The person is situated so that their upper back is on the ground and their pelvis and legs are parallel with the doorway. Again, the end result is the same and usually positive.

Some providers have very nice decompression machines that are extremely effective in separating the vertebrae thus decompressing the disc. With severe disc bulges and herniations, these machines can be lifesavers. The only downside is the expense which can be significant. In our office, we have available a more hands-on form of traction called flexion-distraction. The table we use flexes at the lumbar level and is spring loaded. The doctor puts one hand on the spine holding a specific level in place and uses the opposite hand to push the table down. The spine separates then accommodates as the spring pushes the table back up. If the chiropractor knows what they are doing, this a very effective form of traction and can make a big difference in the disc.

All of the forms of traction that I mentioned above address the low back. There are, however, various units for the neck, as well. There are three main types of cervical traction. One way uses a harness around the chin and base of the skull attached to a rope and pulley. These units either have a counter-weight, usually a water bag, or a tension spring. The other devices look like a collar between the shoulders and the chin/skull that expand when pumped full of air. Both are effective and mostly utilized at home. The third combines traction with an attempt to restore curvature. This unit is a wedge whereupon a person lies with their head hanging over the tall side of the wedge. Often times there is an elastic strap or a weight that pulls down from the forehead.

Whatever method you choose or whichever method is the most effective for you, the key to success, as with most things, is to apply it consistently over a significant length of time. I have a cervical traction unit that I use when my neck is hurting and I routinely have Dr. Wagnon adjust me on the flexion-distraction table. Discs, just like people, sometimes just need a break from the pressures of everyday life, traction or decompression is a great way to accomplish this.

5 Things To Do When Your Back Goes Out

backpainHave you ever bent over to pick up something only to experience a pain like someone shoved a hot poker into your low back and then started pulling your muscles apart? Yeah, most of us have felt that at some point. Hopefully, it  never happens to you, too, but if it does, here is what you do.

  1. Stop and Breathe. You are probably feeling like your life is about to end. Most of what you are experiencing is muscle spasm. Your back muscles are trying to protect you but they have dramatically overreacted. If you can, stay where you are and do your best to let the muscles settle down. Deep breaths and relaxation will dramatically speed up the process. Have some water and wait it out.
  2. Stretch backwards. Typically, when a back goes “out” there is a disc inbetween the vertebrae that is stuck in a bulging position. Bending backwards will help squish that disc back to the center and will also shorten the spasmimg muscles. Go easy with this. Gently push into a cobra position if you are on the floor. Otherwise, brace yourself with your hands on your backside and carefully arch backwards. Do it several times in a row and often thereafter. Here is an old video for demonstration.
  3. Walk, Lie Down, Do NOT Sit. When the spasm has settled down, walk a bit. Movement will help get the blood moving which helps to settle the muscles and get the disc moving. You do not want to overdo this. Move a bit and then lie down on your back with the knees bent. The firmer the surface, the better. Sitting will be counterproductive. When you sit, you increase the pressure on the disc and stretch the muscles of the lower back.
  4. Ice. Icing helps reduce inflammation. Typically, when a back goes out, there is inflammation. The quicker you can get rid of the inflammation, the better. It is not completely out of the question to use heat. Heat will soften the spasming muscles and allow you to move. However, heat also brings more inflammation. If you decide you cannot move without heat, use it, but then move around for a while and then follow up with ice. Both heat and ice should only be used for a maximum of 20 minutes. For ice, the skin needs to get cold enough to go numb to be successful. Here are the stages of ice, so you know you are doing it right. 
  5. Go See Your Chiropractor. Once the spasms have settled down a bit, the inflammation is under control, and you are able to move, it is time to get the joints working properly and the disc back to a good shape. This is what chiropractors do best. An adjustment will get all of the joints in the area to move correctly which will allow the disc to heal properly. Get in as soon as possible before scar tissue makes that first adjustment a painful one.
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The Cost of Waiting

Abraham Lincoln once said, “You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.” The same is true for addressing your health concerns. Several times each day I have patients come in who tell me they have been hurting for days, weeks, months, or even years. The story is usually that they just thought it would get better on its own but it never did. Inevitably, they express their remorse at waiting to come in.

The truth is that with any injury, the body starts the healing process immediately. The concern is whether you will heal correctly. The body will compensate in whichever way it can to stabilize. If muscles are tight or ligaments are overstretched, it will alter the proper movement of joints. Such improper movement causes the nervous system to become confused and ultimately desensitized. Consequently, the body will lay down scar tissue that will promote the new and improper movement patterns which leaves the body susceptible to reinjury or to injury of surrounding tissue.

As a chiropractor, if I can help move the joints in a proper manner before inflammation and scar tissue sets in, then the healing process is a much easier ordeal. If you wait until scar tissue repair has set in when you come in to see me, the first step will be for me to tear down most of that process so the healing can start over. As with remodeling kitchens, the demolition can be ugly. The old adage of getting worse before it gets better is often in play and can lead to a few days of discomfort.

Another caveat to waiting is establishing movement patterns that can be difficult to retrain. Old habits are harder to change than simply making new ones in a fresh environment. Chronic conditions can take years to correct for this very reason. Muscles and joints have memory locked in to the nervous system. In my experience, it typically takes around three months of consistent treatment to change that memory.

Finally, with altered movement, the the body will degenerate quicker. At a joint level that means that tissues will dry up and bone spurs will form. Once a bone spur has formed, everything changes. No amount of adjusting, taking supplements, acupuncture, or whatever is going to remove that. Tissues can be rehydrated but they are never as good as they used to be. This is mortality. However, we can help slow down the degenerative process. At the end of the day, if we just improve the function it is worth it.

All conditions will change over time. The body will strive to compensate but that compensation can lead to issues down the road. If you have an injury or if dysfunction has been brewing for too long, get in! Better yet, come consistently and do your best to maintain good health and function.

 

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How Do I Know If My Chiropractic Treatments Are Helping?

adjustlumbarK

One of the most fulfilling yet difficult aspects of my career is helping people navigate their journey to better health. Healing is a process that can take a lot of time. We tend to think of that process as a straight road from disease or injury to health but that is the exception rather than the rule. Often, things feel worse before they feel better and there are always plateaus and valleys. Helping patients to have faith in the process and continue care inspite of bumps in the road is a worthy challenge.

Everyone comes into the office with disfunction. Not all disfunction is symptomatic but it all has potential to become so. Sometimes people come in with symptoms that are just starting to show but during further examination, I discover that those symptoms are just the tip of a very large disfunctional iceberg. I know that when I start chipping away at the disfuntion below the surface it is going to make those symtoms much more obvious. This can be very alarming. In addition, symptoms can change or move locations. People who are more prone to worry, often need a lot of reassurance to stay the course. There are several signs and symptoms that may cause concern but are actually indicative of progress. Most of these happen in early stages of care.

Pain will often increase with increased movement. Adjustments are designed to move joints that have been stuck or moving improperly for some time. Getting them to move again can cause pain. It is not always pleasant but it is a necessary step. As a rule, the pain should be more of an ache or soreness. Furthermore, pain can centralize and therefore increase in intensity. Centralized pain, or pain that is focalizing on the disfunctional joint, is usually more painful than a broad spread out pain. In this phenomenon, the pain is going back to where it belongs which is a very positive step. The closer your symptoms are to the structure that is actually causing the symptoms, the better the body will be at promoting healing in that area.

Symptoms often change especially when nerves are involved. If a nerve is significantly injured, the worst thing is complete numbness with zero sensation. There is actually no pain. When we lessen the irritation, the sensation is one of pins and needles and achiness. This can be followed by soreness. These symptoms will wax and wane for some time before a complete recovery.

Another change that can happen that will cause a patient mental anguish is when a symptom switches sides. We often see this is disc related injuries. This is not necessarily a bad thing either. It tells me that the disc is not completely stuck in one bulging position and can change or, even better, that it has not degenerated to the point of no return. The ability to change means it can heal.

I find it much better to not focus on symptoms but to look at movement patterns, muscle tone, and inflammation. If range of motion is improving and muscles are calming down, then progress is being made, and it is only a matter of consistency and time before symptoms start to go away for long stretches of time. When people ask if they are getting better, or complain that they are not any better, when I know they are, I usually ask them how they feel after an adjustment. More often than not, they feel significantly better but it just does not last as long as they think it should. As we get better, we also tend to forget how bad the pain was. The contrast of any pain when you have experienced little to no pain promotes the idea that one is not improving. Perspective is the key.

If you feel like chiropractic is not helping you, please take a step back and consider the big picture before you cut your care short, thus nullifying all of the hard work you and your doctor have done to help you become functional again.

 

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Even If I Want to, I Cannot Help Everyone. Neither Can Chiropractic.

The great Aristotle once wrote that “The more you know, the more you know you do not know.” For me, the more experience I gain, the more I realize my limitations. People who know me well, know that I do not lack confidence. I try not to be arrogant but I do my best to assure myself that I can be a force for good in this world. That saying, I must confess that no matter how much I may want to make everyone better, there are just some people that I cannot help.

Recently, I had a patient come in that I hadn’t seen in a couple of years. She did not come in for an adjustment. She came in to explain why I couldn’t help her. You see, back then I gave her several adjustments which provided little to no relief and then she started heading south so she discontinued care. As a doctor, that is the most helpless feeling. It is made significantly worse when there is no explanation why. In her case, she was born with a birth defect called a Chiari Malformation where the lower part of the brain drops below the skull. This can lead to a syringomelia, a pocket of fluid in the spinal cord which can be very painful and dangerous. Anyway, this was never mentioned in her MRI report from years earlier. The neuro/spine specialist that she saw some time after seeing me saw it on the MRI. This little bit of information explained everything. I am grateful she came in and shared that with me.

There will always be conditions that are too far advanced for me to help. I don’t like it, but that is the way it is. We do not always know when a condition is beyond help until after we have tried. I have had many patients with serious back pain come in and ask if I can help. As a chiropractor, I know I can adjust them. In most cases, this will help in the healing process. At the very least, it is a conservative start. Most patients get better and we can manage. Others do not. I have recommended MRI’s and surgery when it is beyond my help. For the most part, those patients have seen good results and have come back to me for care after their surgeries.

Finally, there are people who either do not really want to be helped or have unrealistic expectations of how long and what it will take to heal. Healing takes time and effort. One adjustment can make a big difference in how a patient feels but it does not mean that their injury has healed. Consistent care is tentamount to healing properly. Likewise, just because there is still pain, it does not mean that injury is not healing. Pain can be tricky and is not a very good indicator of the level of damage.

In short, I sleep at night knowing that I do my best to help others live healthier lives. There are always challenges and there will be people that despite my knowledge, skills, and determination, I cannot help. For those people, I am sorry. I feel bad for you and hope there is some one out there with the answers and approach to help you in your journey.

Momentum of Healing

It is always interesting when a new patient who has never seen a chiropractor before,  and knows very little about it, asks what it will take to get better. When I explain that we are going to start off adjusting them three times a week, their eyes usually get very big and the eventual question is, “Why so often?” My answer is always the same, because you need consistency and momentum to heal.

Healing can be like climbing up a sand hill. When you first start out, the sand is the thickest and you are very prone to getting stuck or sliding back down. Likewise, if you are not concentrating on healing correctly, you can start going sideways and waste a lot of energy but not get anywhere. Heading in the right direction with enough momentum to gain traction is the only way.

Getting adjusted three times a week in the beginning of care provides the momentum necessary to progress up the sandy hill of healing. A little higher up on that hill it does not take as much energy so twice a week is sufficient to keep healing. However, stopping or slowing too much can make it difficult to get started again and complete the healing process.

Strengtheining the Core Through Coordination

When we talk about “the core” of the body, we are typically referencing the musculature around the abdomen and low back. These muscles consist of the abdominal muscles (rectus abdomini,  internal obliques, external obliques, and transversi) and the muscles of the back (lattisimus dorsi, serratus posterior inferior muscles, erector spinae, multifidi, interspinalis muscles, lateral intertransversi muscles, quadratus lumborum, and to some degree the iliopsoas).

Strengthening the core has become a fairly popular mantra these days. Many of us are walking around with poor posture and a fair amount of dysfunction as a result of poor core stability. A weak core leaves one susceptible to a host of joint and disc injuries as well as overly tight butt and leg and muscles. In contrast, a strong core can prevent a host of back injuries.

The word strength, however, needs some clarification in the context of strengthening the core. When most people think of strengthening muscles, they picture muscles moving against  significant resistance like lifting weights or power movement against gravity or some other force. These type of exercises can actually be detrimental to the core muscle and increase the risk of injury to the spine. Coordinating the movement of all of these muscle is what is most beneficial.

I mentioned in my last article that postural muscles are slow twitch, white fiber muscles designed for endurance. They need to be strong enough to hold you up all day. Strength in this case does not come from bigger muscle fibers but from having all of the muscle firing in a controlled and proper order. For example, if you lift a box, ideally your abdominal muscle and your spinal muscle would contract at the same time to stabilize the body so the shoulder and arms and hips and leg muscles can utilize their power to lift it. What often happens is that core muscle lay dormant until a significant strain forces is to respond. So, when you lift a box, you first engage your back muscles until you are upright then, if you go past vertical, the abdominal muscles will engage. Then, they will fire back and forth while they try to find a semblance of stability.

I bring this all to your attention to encourage you to strengthen your core appropriately. Exercises that promote coordinated movement like yoga, pilates, and modified exercises from yoga can make a huge difference. It can take time to build coordination  and it takes a consistent effort. In the following videos I demonstrate four very useful exercises for coordinating core muscles and therefore, strengthening it.

Cat/Cow

Bird Dog

A Safe Crunch

Side Bridge

A Frank Discussion with Your Medical Doctor

The purpose of this blog post is in no way to belittle or degrade the medical profession. My best friend is a medical doctor and I have several friends whom I admire and respect who are medical doctors. Furthermore, I have many medical doctors who refer patients to me on a consistent basis. No, this article is for those medical doctors who refuse to educate themselves on the benefits of alternative health care. Lately I have had a few medical doctors tell our mutual patients that they should not get adjusted anymore. Every single one of them cited arthritis as the reason why they should discontinue care with me. I hope this article will educate you as a patient of such physicians and maybe even influence some of them to do some research.

First of all, arthritis is a very generic term. Medical doctors routinely use it for any ache or pain in a joint. Most of the time calling it arthritis is technically true but over simplistic. It seems to me like they use it liberally because they do not want to explain what is really going on. Arthritis means is inflammation in a joint. It can be caused by auto-immune conditions like Rheumatoid or Lupus but more often it is caused by wear and tear. This is rarely explained to a patient so I am going to.

When doctors tell you that you have arthritis, most of the time what they are saying is that they can see signs of degeneration on your x-rays. Examples of degeneration are decreased joint space, bone spurs and misalignment. Essentially, instead of seeing nicely aligned joints with smooth edges, they see jagged edges with varying degrees of misalignment. This happens over time. How quickly is determined by how dysfunctional the joint is. The more dysfunctional the quicker it degenerates. Dysfunction of a joint means it is either not moving properly or not moving at all.

In the spine, the vertebrae have discs that can degenerate. Usually, this is associated with a disc herniation or bulge. Degeneration in the spine can lead to stenosis or narrowing of the openings where the nerve roots travel. Spinal degeneration or arthritis can come in varying degrees and complications. I am very aware of the risks involved with adjusting a highly degenerative spine.

Let me repeat that. I am very aware of the risks of adjusting a spine that has arthritis or degeneration! I also know the benefits. For this reason, I am very frustrated with these MD’s who are telling my patients to stop. Do they think I am unaware of my patient’s condition? Do they believe that I have no regard for my patient’s health? To be honest, I don’t believe they consider this, at all. I see fear derived from ignorance.

The truth is that an adjustment of a degenerating joint can be very beneficial. Retraining the joints to move properly can decrease inflammation and increase the nerve flow to that area which will at the very least slow down the degenerating process. Increased function will lead to improvement to the health of the joint. Are there risks? Of course. There are risks to everything. I believe the greatest risk is doing nothing. It is certainly the most predictable risk.

Trusting in your chiropractor to know when to adjust or not is important. Communication is the key! If you have a condition and you are unsure of your chiropractors awareness of it, express your concern. On that same note, avoid taking advice from people who don’t know. They shouldn’t be making recommendations about things of which they are ignorant. That doesn’t seem to be stopping some of them. If you stopped chiropractic care because your MD told you to, but have’t discussed it with your chiropractor, its time to have a frank and open discussion with all the parties involved, OK?