What Makes a Comfortable Adjustment?

When a chiropractor adjusts a person, the goal is to get joints moving properly. Because we are talking about movement, the force equation comes into play: Force = Mass x Acceleration. So, in order to adjust, a chiropractor needs mass and acceleration. If there is not enough mass, they need enough acceleration and vice versa. In general, the greater the acceleration, the more comfortable the adjustment.

There are a number of reasons a quick adjustment is preferable. Most people guard to some degree when getting adjusted. It is a natural response. Guarding only gets worse when someone tries to increase the force by increasing mass because the body is aware of the force. Along those same lines, an adjustment when someone is guarding doesn’t always move the joints thoroughly enough which leads to an unsatisfied feeling that there is still something not moving correctly. In addition, the  nerve sensors of a joint, known as the proprioceptors, need to be stimulated to get the full benefit of an adjustment. The only way to do that is with a quick movement of the joint.

Everybody is different in how they interpret comfort. Some like a firm touch others gentle. Some like to hear the cracking sound and some do not. Regardless of preference, thorough movement of joints is critical for a proper adjustment. Whether the speed is achieved through skilled hands, an adjusting tool like the Activator, or a drop table, the quicker the movement, the less mass and the less trauma on the body.

How to Treat Sprained Ankles.

Whenever I get several patients who come in with the same ailment, I always feel like the universe is telling me to write about it. When that same ailment happens to me, the hint is as subtle as a two by four to the head. Such is the case with this article.

I have had a lot of patients come in with sprained ankles lately. For me, I didn’t think it was possible to sprain my ankles anymore. The ligaments in my ankles are pretty much gone from spraining them several times playing soccer in high school and college. So much for that. I rolled it jumping on the trampoline with my kids yesterday. It usually smarts initially and that is about it. This time it continued to hurt and started swelling a little, too. So, “Doctor, heal thyself!”

Here is the protocol: First you have to remember the mnemonic PRICE. P=protect, R=rest, I=ice,  C=compress, E=elevate. I stopped jumping and walked it off. I rested with it elevated. Then, I put it in an ice bucket (protocol details below). I planned on wrapping it up but it felt stable and the swelling was down when I woke up this morning so I thought I would be alright. In fact, I walked to work today and it felt just fine.

The most important thing to do if you sprain an ankle is ice it. Ice packs on an ankle are almost useless. You just don’t get enough surface contact to penetrate to the joint. If you are going to do it, be sure to leave it on for 20 minutes. However, the best way to ice the ankle is to put it in an ice bath. Here are the steps:

1.As soon as possible after a sprained ankle get a bucket big enough to fit your foot

2. Fill it with ice about 4 inches deep

3. Fill the bucket with water deep enough to reach just below the calf muscle (higher for high ankle sprains)

4. Cover the toes with a sock if needed

5. Immerse foot for 6-10 minutes until numb.

This is not exactly fun (unless you are a masochist) so, be tough. The stages of icing are intense cold followed by aching then burning then numbness. You have to get to numbness to benefit. Some people cheat a little and put on a sock covered by a baggie. This is ok as long as the sock is not too thick and there is not an air barrier in baggie. It still has to get to numb!

If you chronically sprain your ankles like I used to, you will have to rehab them. The more you sprain a joint, the worse the proprioception or the communication between the brain and the joint. In short, it becomes dull and you are much more likely to sprain it again. I recommend standing on a wobble board for several minutes each day. That will improve the proprioception and dramatically decrease the likelihood of future sprains.

Proprio…What? or, Are You Coordinated?


One of the best ways that chiropractic can help everyone from everyday folks to elite athletes is by improving proprioception (pronounced:pro-pre[long “e”]-o-sep-shun).

Proprioception has to do with coordination and position sense. Try this experiment. Close your eyes and touch the tip of your nose with your finger tip. Were you able to do it? The highest number of nerve receptors that sense movement are in the neck, hands and feet. All joints, however, have their fair share. The better these receptors work, the better the body can respond.

Let me give you an example. If a person sprains his or her ankle, they are more likely to sprain it again and again. The reason this happens is because first, the ligaments are weak but more importantly because with injury the proprioceptors become dull. It doesn’t have to be injury either. Posture changes proprioceptors, as well.

The danger of having dulled proprioceptors is a much broader topic than you probably want to delve into at this time. Suffice it to say that if your proprioceptors are not working well, you leave yourself very susceptible to injury. Likewise, pain sensation travels on the same nerve fibers so pain increases as proprioception decreases and vice versa.

The trick to getting these proprioceptors to wake up? Get the joint moving. Lack of motion or improper motion scrambles the receptors. Proper stimulation through movement, improves their function. Chiropractic adjustments and activities that challenge us physically both in strength and coordination are the best ways I can think of to accomplish this goal.