Tennis Elbow? I Do Not Even Play Tennis!

tennis-elbow-pictureIn a world where we have so much access to information, I find that when it comes to diagnoses, there are some overly-simplified patterns. If there is pain in the foot, it is plantar fascitis, pain down the leg is labeled sciatica, and elbow pain is tennis elbow. Not that these conditions are not common; just not that common. Tennis elbow is particularly over-diagnosed. Pain in the elbow is common. Tennis elbow, however, is specifically pain resulting from injury to the extensor tendons which insert at the lateral epicondyle causing inflammation and dysfunction. Simply put, to be tennis elbow, the pain must be right around the little knob on the outside of the elbow and get worse when trying to extend the wrist with resistance. It is called tennis elbow presumably because repetitive backhand swings in tennis will cause such a condition. Incidentally, pain on the inner knob is known as golfers elbow.

I have found that neither tennis elbow or golfers elbow are more common than just a regular subluxated elbow. As a hinge that rotates and pivots and is made up of three bones and two joints, dysfunction is easy to come by. Often, the radial head will get stuck farther back than it should be. This will cause a strain on the muscles that insert in that area and mimic or create tennis elbow. The good news is that with an adjustment or a few, the condition typically responds quickly. If it is, indeed, tennis elbow, the best thing to do is to make sure the elbow is adjusted and functioning properly, then focus on the tendons with ice, stretching, and myofascial massage or active release. So, the next time somebody complains of tennis elbow, tell them to see their local friendly chiropractor.

 

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