If you have never had SI joint pain, you are probably wondering where this particular joint is located. If you have had or currently have SI joint pain, you know it can be a pain in the butt, literally. The Si joint or sacroiliac joint is formed by the sacrum, the trapezoidal bone below the lumbar spine and above the coccyx, and the pelvis, or ilia. There are two joints on either side of the sacrum. The movement of the SI joint is called nutation and it is pretty slight. One does not really even notice the movement until it gets stuck and then it is all too obvious.

A chiropractic adjustment can do wonders to relieve the pain associated with an SI joint that is not moving properly. I have found that using the drop table is particularly effective. I usually follow it up with a side posture adjustment. Sometimes, however, that is not enough. On occasion, I find a stuck SI joint even after the adjustment. In these situations, I look to the pubic symphysis.

The pubic symphysis is a tricky joint. It is formed where the pelvis meets in front. It is a cartilaginous joint that is planar. What I find when something is wrong is one of the pubic rami is higher than the other. Because the pubic symphysis is on the opposite side of the SI joint but still the same bone, if it is not moving right, the Si joint will have problems, too. I use an activator to adjust the pubic symphysis. This is a fairly sensitive area so using the activator makes it more comfortable both physically and socially.

So if you are having problems getting the results you need from a typical SI joint adjustment, have your chiropractor check your pubic symphysis. As with all treatment, it can take several visits before you see significant results. Still, you should start seeing some signs of improvement fairly quickly to help you know you are on the right path.