Consistency and Persistency in Chiropractic

First off, I know that persistency is not a real word. It is a joke to get your attention. Even if Charles Barkley, or any other athlete turned commentator, might use such a faux word to great effect, the true word is persistence. Now that we have that out of the way, let’s talk about why this is the topic of this article.

We live in an instant gratification society. People want to see results immediately and there is very little patience if they do not.  This is true in healthcare, as well. The only problem is that it does not work. Healing is a process that takes time, effort and energy. The more consistent the effort and energy put into healing over time, the better the results.

In addition, there is significantly more value in going through the process. All too often, I am sitting across from a patient explaining the healing process and how it takes time and consistency when I see the glaze fall over their eyes. From there, they either just ignore what I explained or they honestly believe they are the exception. Very few people are the exception, that is why they are the exception!

For chiropractic, the healing process centers mostly around the function of joints. We help train joints how to move correctly which then helps re-train the nervous system which then re-trains the muscle system. Proper movement promotes coordination between the three and establishes a body awareness. This awareness helps maintain balance and function and helps us avoid future injury. Proper function also slows down degeneration. Again, this is a process. On average, people get adjusted three times a week in the beginning. After about a month, they drop to twice a week and then eventually once a week. After about three months, the patient is typically as functional as they are going to be and ready for maintenance care.

Heber J. Grant said, “That which we persist in doing becomes easier. Not that the nature of the task has changed, but our ability to perform it increases.” This is true with joint movement, as well. At the beginning of care, joints are resistant to change. Not only are they harder to move but they also revert back to old movement patterns. It takes several adjustments in close succession to generate enough healing momentum to make a change. If you are persistent in making that change and are consistent in the application, you will reap the reward of an adjustment that lasts longer and keeps your body from falling apart. In other words, it is not that the adjustment has changed but that your body becomes accustomed to the proper movement. Proper movement, and all of the health benefits that come with it is the result of consistency and persistency.

***Photo by Emily Campbell on Unsplash

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