There are 22 bones in the skull connected by a type of joint called a suture. In the old days, doctors thought these bones fused together in adulthood. Now, we know that they can and do move with some regularity. The suture as a joint is only found in the skull. It doesn’t pop like the synovial joints in our backs and extremities, they just shift a little here and there. Because there is movement, though, it can be adjusted, and because of the proximity to the brain, the results can be very beneficial.

There are several reasons people need the cranial bones adjusted. Most often it is due to a build-up of sinus pressure which changes the shape of the skull. The sinuses are open areas in the middle of cranial bones. They have a mucous lining and are sensitive to atmospheric changes. When full, as a result of a cold or allergies, they tend to hurt from the pressure. When one gets cranial bones adjusted, it regulates the pressure and promotes drainage into lower sinuses and into the lymphatic system.

Another reason to adjust the cranial bones is for TMJ issues that won’t resolve with adjusting the jaw. The “T” in TMJ stands for Temporal, as in the temporal bone. It makes the socket part of the joint where the mandible articulates. If it is shifted, the joint is not going to work right no matter how much you try to increase the movement of the mandible.

I have seen great success adjusting the cranial bones. It seems a little odd but it can make a difference. It can help with sinus issues, headaches, TMJ syndrome,  and a host of weird neurlogical conditions due to mild pressure on the brain.  Let me know if you want me to check it out.